Raspberry Sandwich

These next couple of post from my wife’s blog, Dewsbury Victorian Families, form part of an incredibly engaging story from the past, saying far more in a few words than a whole archive of documents can say in a lifetime of study.

Memories are not only accessible though the conventional academic routes of well thumbed and quoted documents and manuscripts, but a richer and more engaging past can be accessed by walking in the footsteps of someone from the past. You then see the world through the eyes of someone who lived a hundred years ago, and for a brief moment in time, you engage with the minds of the dead.

DewsburyVictorianFamilies

So, Eleanor sent George Finney a raspberry sandwich from Dewsbury to the trenches in France.

What constituted a raspberry sandwich for the Kirk girls? I had a look in Minnie’s books to find out and discovered no less than four recipes. Interestingly, none of them mention raspberries so I assume the spreading of raspberry jam between the two halves of the sandwich goes without saying. Here are the recipes:

DNG-Raspberry-sandwich_1-for-blog

I don’t have enough information to trace Mrs Denison, but Minnie was related to Denisons on her mother’s side.

I like this recipe very much. I like the ambiguity of the quantities which suggests to me that Mrs Denison had made this cake many times and knew the quantities without weighing and measuring. I’ve had frustrating conversations with my own family members along the lines of “Well, how much flour?” “Oh, about two cups full.” “How big a cup?” Did Minnie…

View original post 227 more words

About morturn

Historian – Photographer – Filmmaker Retired construction professional with a passion for public, social and industrial history. I believe in equality, dignity and integrity for all. Don’t like people who try to belittle the ambitions of others. I am of the opinion that my now life belongs to the whole community and as long as I live, it is my privilege to do for it whatever I can. I want to be thoroughly used up when I die, for the harder I work the more I live.
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s